Day 2 of tour

An early start at 5.30am to watch the sunrise. We stopped just outside angkor wat and sat by the lake. As we were sitting the tour guide told me more about the political situation during the pol pot regime and after. Millions of people were killed during this regime and apparently the first killing began when khmer people were informed that they had to kill educational people. Around 100 000 people were killed that day but it is still an open case as to who sent that message to kill the people. The guide also said about the locals having to drink dirty water when ge was young. In his school he could only learn German and Russian but when he was older he started learning english under a stilt house with a teacher but only writing not speaking. When he began being a taxi driver he would practice his english speaking with tourists.

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After breakfast we were off to the            lake to see the stilt house village. Im writing this at a restaurant by the lake. Ordered a big meal as im always hungry :). I wasnt too sure what to expect. Ive seen stilt houses before but nothing like this. The houses were held up by tree trunks.

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How they stay up I dont know. You can imagine how high the floods get by how high the houses are. Families have to stay in their houses when the floods are bad. There are also bridges over the river made from thick branches. The water is filthy and there rubbish on the sides. Hard to believe this is peoples lives.

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Me on the boat with the driver doing a cheeky photo bomb.

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We stopped off at the temple in the village. These women were preparing lunch for the monks. Monks have to shave their hair off.

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I was suprised at how many schools were here. I could just wander in the classroom and take a picture. The children chanted something in cambodian, saying hello and thankyou. The classrooms were so hot, there wernt even any fans. The kids and teachers were sweating. The only english was the alphabet. Hardly any resources. But still all smiling and laughing. They were so cute.

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Alot of the kids didnt have any shoes. Their feet had infected sores on them. They didnt seem bothered though. Their uniforms were filthy but they were all wearing them. One little book walked up to me and shook my hand. 2 girls poked their hands out of the window to touch mine. Even though they didnt have much, I didnt feel sad. They were so happy. Such strong people and kids.

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A local women asked me if I wanted to buy notebooks and pencils for the kids. Heres me giving some. She looks pretty happy. This photo makes me smile.

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Here they are with their new supplies. They love a picture.

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Some new friends followed me down the road and held my hands. One girl kept looking at my long nails. She seemed pretty fascinated and held my hand up to scratch her cheek with them. They then went off to their homes. I wanted to stay longer but I didnt. You really appreciate the little things when you see this and we need a reminder now and again of how lucky we are.

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Continuing through the river. These are mangrove trees. The trunks were so cool.

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This was a restaurant on the water. They had a baby crocodile farm and a random python.

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On the way back there were signs outside houses and wells. They were donated by mostly American  charities or were dedicated to people. Was pretty cool to see so many. Heres a donated well.

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My lunch and the biggest coconut ever. I hope theres plenty of pee stops this afternoon.

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This temple was called banreay srei ‘womens temple’ and is famous for its pink and yellow sandstone.

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Alot of the carvings had been restored as so much of the temple had been restored. The carvings were so detailed and told stories of the gods.

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Standing in a doorway. You can see how beautiful the design is.

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This temples was built 2000 years before ankor wat so is a very old building. The buddha statues are the protectors.

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This was the last stop of the tour. The road to this temple was too dangerous during the pol pot regime as it was full of landmines. Landmines were layed across the whole length of cambodian thai border. The local people of cambodia were forced by vietnamese to plant the landmines to stop any attacks from the khmer people in Thailand. The goverment planted more around villages to protect them. We passed a sign saying that this area had been cleared of them.

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Most of this building was crumbled but the towers stood tall. They cremated bodies here. You could see the stone rectangular block where they put the bodies in to burn. They then collected the left over bones put them in a box then in stone and put them on top of the wall of this temple. This was for the important people.

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One of the protecting towers surrounding the main tower where the king would be buried. My guide told me that years ago when they cremate a family member they burn the bones after thry have been cremated and drink them. He said he had drank his brothers bones and that it didnt smell bad. If people wanted to be buried they would put the body in a tree and let the animals eat the bodies. They would then go back, collect the bones and bury them. Not sure how people would prefer that or how the situation is today.
I booked this tour with happyangkortour.com

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